Download Autogas Guide from BoostLPG and Richard Hammond
  1. Why should I convert?
  2. Where can I get my car converted?
  3. Can all vehicles be converted to run on LPG?
  4. Can diesel engines be converted?
  5. How much does the conversion cost?
  6. Can I get a government grant?
  7. How long does the conversion process take?
  8. Can I buy a car already converted to LPG?
  9. Will it cost a lot more if it's already been converted?
  10. What happens in the process of conversion?
  11. Will I lose boot space?
  12. Does that mean I can't carry a spare tyre?
  13. What are the different systems that are available?
  14. Does it matter which system I have installed in my car?
  15. Does the equipment come with a warranty?
  16. Can the system be transferred to another car?
  17. Will my car's performance be affected?
  18. What happens if I run out of LPG autogas while I am driving?
  19. What type of mpg can I expect from a tank of LPG?
  20. How will I know when to refuel?
  21. Where can I fill up with LPG?
  22. Is it possible to add the wrong fuel to the wrong tank?
  23. Can I overfill the tank?
  24. How safe is LPG in an accident?
  25. Can LPG damage or affect my engine?
  26. What type of servicing does it require?
  27. How will converting affect the resale value of my car?
  28. Can I still take my car abroad?
  29. Can I buy LPG autogas abroad?
  30. Will I still have to pay the congestion charge?
  31. Is there anyone I should inform about my conversion?
  32. How will it affect my insurance?
  33. Do lots of people use LPG?
  34. What is going to happen to LPG prices?


  1. Why should I convert?

    Not only is LPG an environmentally friendly fuel as it produces fewer harmful pollutants and less noise, but on average it's half the price of regular unleaded petrol. With other possible benefits such as lower road tax and reduced engine wear, overall running costs for LPG vehicles are up to 40% less.


  2. Where can I get my car converted?

    It's strongly advised that you use an LPGA approved installer so that the job is properly handled. As in any technical procedure, you should always use an expert.


  3. Can all vehicles be converted to run on LPG?

    Most engines can be converted to bi-fuel, but if you have any doubts it is best to talk to an approved installer (see 2 above).


  4. Can diesel engines be converted?

    Yes, but it's a much more complicated process and we do not recommend it at the moment.


  5. How much does the conversion cost?

    Depending on the size of the vehicle and the type of system, conversion to LPG costs from around £1,600. Any LPGA approved installer will be happy to provide you with a no obligation quotation.


  6. Can I get a government grant?

    Grants are no longer available.


  7. How long does the conversion process take?

    About three working days.


  8. Can I buy a car already converted to LPG?

    Yes. If not second-hand, many major manufacturers offer bi-fuel models, such as Ford, Rover, Volvo and Vauxhall.


  9. Will it cost a lot more if it's already been converted?

    Depending on the manufacturer, the additional price is close to that of a conversion.


  10. What happens in the process of conversion?

    A second independent fuel system with its own tank is added to the car, often in place of the spare wheel or underneath the vehicle.


  11. Will I lose boot space?

    Gas tanks are available in a range of different sizes, and loss of space can be kept to a minimum by installing a doughnut-shaped tank into the spare wheel well.


  12. Does that mean I can't carry a spare tyre?

    Depending on the size of your car, it is possible to have the system installed underneath the car. If not, you can keep a can of tyre foam so you can reflate and seal the puncture until it can be repaired.


  13. What are the different systems that are available?

    A Venturi single point system, and a multi-point sequential injection system.


  14. Does it matter which system I have installed in my car?

    Yes, it's crucial to have the right system installed. All conversions are dependent upon the age and type of vehicle you have: an older carburettor vehicle will have a different system to a modern fuel-injected one. Again, it's vital that this is done by an approved installer.


  15. Does the equipment come with a warranty?

    New cars already converted will already carry a warranty. However, as part of conversion, some companies will include a warranty as part of the service. If not you can buy it for £70-£90 per year.


  16. Can the system be transferred to another car?

    Possibly, but because the new vehicle needs an LPG Conversion Certificate, the procedure must be carried out by an approved installer.


  17. Will my car's performance be affected?

    There is a negligible loss of power. The only thing you will notice, when compared with diesel, is a smoother, quieter ride.


  18. What happens if I run out of LPG autogas while I am driving?

    You will be able to flick back to petrol by a button or switch until you reach an LPG autogas refuelling station.


  19. What type of mpg can I expect from a tank of LPG?

    A litre of LPG will take you around 80% of the way that petrol would take you, but it still works out cheaper because LPG averages half the price of petrol.


  20. How will I know when to refuel?

    Like a regular petrol-powered car, there is a fuel indicator that will indicate how much LPG is in your tank. Just like petrol or diesel, LPG is bought by the litre and pumped into the tank through the filling point and the hose.


  21. Where can I fill up with LPG?

    There are more than 1,200 refuelling stations in GB. This number is growing daily. A list of stations can be found at www.lpga.co.uk and at www.go-autogas.com.


  22. Is it possible to add the wrong fuel to the wrong tank?

    This is impossible because each filling point is different to the other, so the LPG filling point only accepts an LPG hose.


  23. Can I overfill the tank?

    No, because the LPG tank is fitted with an automatic shut-off valve that will prevent overfilling.


  24. How safe is LPG in an accident?

    Very, much more than petrol or diesel. It's a common misunderstanding that because LPG is a gas, it's highly explosive. However, because of the way it's stored, it can't explode in an accident as it never comes into contact with oxygen, unlike petrol. Furthermore the LPG tank can survive far greater impact than a normal petrol tank and has numerous in-built safety devices.


  25. Can LPG damage or affect my engine?

    Most engines can be converted without causing any damage as long as your engine is suitable, which the installer should verify. LPG is a cleaner burning fuel and will actually reduce wear and tear.


  26. What type of servicing does it require?

    You must continue with your routine car servicing, and an approved installer should check your LPG system on a yearly basis.


  27. How will converting affect the resale value of my car?

    As long as your system has been installed by an approved installer, the resale value will not decrease and may even increase depending on the condition of the rest of your car.


  28. Can I still take my car abroad?

    Yes, you can, although at the moment LPG cars are not allowed to pass through the Channel Tunnel (this is under review).


  29. Can I buy LPG autogas abroad?

    Autogas is widely available in most European countries. The LPGA website provides links to other websites that include the locations of refuelling sites abroad. Check www.lpga.co.uk.


  30. Will I still have to pay the congestion charge?

    Yes, LPG cars are no longer exempt from London's Congestion Charge.


  31. Is there anyone I should inform about my conversion?

    Yes, your insurer and the DVLA. Go to www.dvla.gov.uk.


  32. How will it affect my insurance?

    There should be no problems with your premium, as long as the conversion was carried out by an approved installer.


  33. Do lots of people use LPG?

    Latest estimates claim that there are 107,000 LPG vehicles in the UK with numbers constantly increasing. The Queen, the Prime Minister and the President of the USA all drive LPG cars.


  34. What is going to happen to LPG prices?

    The Government has made sweeping cuts in LPG fuel duty. Over the last 8 years, duty on petrol and diesel has been increased in the budget, whereas duty on LPG has been either frozen or reduced, thanks to its environmental benefits. In 2001, duty on LPG was slashed by 40% and frozen at this level until 2004.

    The Chancellor has also agreed that in future Budgets he will give 3 years' advance notice of any changes in fuel duty compared with petrol and diesel. This means that we know the price of LPG will remain at around half the price of petrol and diesel for at least this period.

    It was also announced that company car taxation would be reviewed to simplify and incentivise the treatment of the cleanest LPG vehicles from 2006.